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PICTURES FROM SKÅNE

Skåne, or Scania, the southernmost province of Sweden, is part of a historic and geographic entity called Skåneland, which also includes the neighboring Swedish provinces Halland and Blekinge and the Danish island Bornholm. In 1658 they all became Swedish, but Bornholm was returned to Denmark in 1660. Before that the area had a checkered history, sometimes belonging to Denmark, sometimes to Sweden, and at other times enjoying independence. The flag's origin can be traced back to the banner of an Archbishop of Lund in the 12th century. Traveling in Skåne, you see many of these flags flying. The name Scania comes from Latin and means Dangerous Island. (The Romans thought Scania was an island.) The name Scandinavia is derived from the same word.

Related pages:  Posters and Prints of Skåne - Öresund

OLD CHURCHES dot the landscape throughout Scandinavia

The Maria Church in Gråmanstorp, built in

the 1160's.

Finja Church, from the early 12th century.

 VASA LAKE

Near the lake is an Iron Age grave field, with two unusual stone settings in the shape of large three-pointed stars. The photo shows one of the points.

The upper photo shows Vasasjön (Vasa Lake), and the lower a side pond covered with wild yellow waterlilies.

THE MANMADE WETLANDS AT FINJA LAKE

The 11 square kilometer large Finjasjön (Finja Lake) near the town Hässleholm used to be so polluted that swimming in it was out of the question. The pictures above are not of the lake itself, but show two of a series of dams near it. The dams play an important role in the area's innovative water treatment system. The waste water is first treated at a sewage treatment plant, then filtered through dams planted with water plants that reduce pollutants, before reaching the lake. The wetlands area also serves as a refuge for more than 150 bird species and has become a favorite spot for birdwatchers. Swimming is again possible in the lake.

You can find out more about the project on the following sites:

 Read more about the project in Waste water treatment in Hässleholm and Magle Wetland

Hässleholmsvatten is in Swedish, with interesting illustrations.